Research Article

Interactive E-Note and Problem-Solving Strategies Effects on Junior Secondary School Students’ Achievements in Mathematics, Kaduna-Nigeria

S. Abiade Olumuyiwa 1 * , M. Kolawole Akinsola 2
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1 Federal College of Forestry Mechanization, P.M.B 2273, Afaka Kaduna, NIGERIA2 Department of Science and Technology Education, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, NIGERIA* Corresponding Author
Contemporary Mathematics and Science Education, 2(1), 2021, ep21008, https://doi.org/10.30935/conmaths/10787
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ABSTRACT

Mathematics aids the development of science and technology, but many secondary school students perform poorly in it in public examinations in Kaduna-Nigeria due to ineffective instructional strategies adopted by teachers. Hence the need to complement mathematics teaching with tools that could engage learners actively. Interactive e-note Mathematics Instructional Strategy (IMIS) and Problem-Solving Strategy (PSS) capability of enhancing students’ achievement in mathematics in junior secondary schools were determined by this study with moderating effects of gender and school type.
The pretest-posttest control group quasi-experimental design using 3x2x2 factorial matrix was adopted. Three private and public schools were purposively selected and randomly assigned to IMIS (134), PSS (134) and control (132) groups from two randomized Local Government Areas within Kaduna. Instrumentation are Mathematics Achievement Test (r = 0.87) and instructional guides. Data analysis was by Analysis of covariance and Bonferroni post-hoc test at 0.05 level of significance.
Treatment, School type had significant main effect on students achievement in mathematics (F(2,385)=7.01; partial ƞ2=0.04), (F(1,385) =27.63; partial ƞ2=0.07) in private school respectively. Post achievement mean score are IMIS (21.48), control (20.42) and PSS (20.30). Treatment and school type had significant interaction effect on mathematics achievement (F(2,385)=12.23; partial ƞ2=0.06) from private school in control group.
Mathematics aids the development of science and technology, but many secondary school students perform poorly in it in public examinations in Kaduna-Nigeria due to ineffective instructional strategies adopted by teachers. Hence the need to complement mathematics teaching with tools that could engage learners actively. Interactive e-note Mathematics Instructional Strategy (IMIS) and Problem-Solving Strategy (PSS) capability of enhancing students’ achievement in mathematics in junior secondary schools were determined by this study with moderating effects of gender and school type.
The pretest-posttest control group quasi-experimental design using 3x2x2 factorial matrix was adopted. Three private and public schools were purposively selected and randomly assigned to IMIS (134), PSS (134) and control (132) groups from two randomized Local Government Areas within Kaduna. Instrumentation are Mathematics Achievement Test (r = 0.87) and instructional guides. Data analysis was by Analysis of covariance and Bonferroni post-hoc test at 0.05 level of significance.
Treatment, School type had significant main effect on students achievement in mathematics (F(2,385)=7.01; partial ƞ2=0.04), (F(1,385) =27.63; partial ƞ2=0.07) in private school respectively. Post achievement mean score are IMIS (21.48), control (20.42) and PSS (20.30). Treatment and school type had significant interaction effect on mathematics achievement (F(2,385)=12.23; partial ƞ2=0.06) from private school in control group.

CITATION (APA)

Olumuyiwa, S. A., & Akinsola, M. K. (2021). Interactive E-Note and Problem-Solving Strategies Effects on Junior Secondary School Students’ Achievements in Mathematics, Kaduna-Nigeria. Contemporary Mathematics and Science Education, 2(1), ep21008. https://doi.org/10.30935/conmaths/10787

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